1996

DR. DRE: Tupac never knew me.

2001

ICE CUBE: I just do shit for Ice Cube fans, not for Hip-Hop fans.

1996

YELLA: Me and Dre produced all Eazy, N.W.A. All of that. Me and him did that together.

2006

JERRY HELLER: There are people that think that I am the White Devil.

Book Features

what you will learn from this book

They had all moved on in different directions since N.W.A. Some were now in different groups, or running their own crew, while others had embarked on solo careers. Yet they were all still tied in some way to the West Coast Hip-Hop legacy of N.W.A And that meant they were inevitably still tied to controversy.

#1 In The Beginning

What mob restaurant did Jerry Heller meet all his clients and tell them they were either gonna record for Ruthless or he couldn’t represent them?

#4 The End of N.W.A

Who was on the N.W.A business team?

#10 Westside Connection Vs Q-Tip & Common

What songs drove Westside Connection to diss Common and Q-Tip?

#11 Dr. Dre Presents ... The Aftermath

What did Dr. Dre think of Snoop Doggy Dogg’s Tha Doggfather album?

#13 Jerry Heller Come to Face The Game

What happened when Jerry Heller came to face with The Game?

#15 The Movie

Who had the money lined up to Produce an N.W.A movie in 2006?

#18 Ice Cube: From Burning to Turning Hollywood

How did Ice Cube go from burning to turning Hollywood?

Exclusive audio clips

Real talk In Their Own Words!

In an exclusive 2006 interview inside his home, Jerry Heller responded to all questions and held nothing back. In 2001, 2003 and 2006 exclusive interviews, and a 1996 press conference, Ice Cube spoke on hardcore Hip-Hop, New York City media, his battle with B-Real and Cypress Hill, Common, the explosive dis song “No Vaseline”, both his film and music career on the set of Friday After Next, and his passion for the Los Angeles Lakers and Oakland Raiders.

Jerry Heller responds to being branded a crook

Jerry Heller goes into detail responding to his critics.

The Real Ice Cube

Ice Cube responds to his critics.

Preview the digital Amazon version here:

Free Samples

excerpts from N.W.A: The Aftermath

Combined the interviews provide a first-hand history of N.W.A with a view to the future, and a key look into the state of mind of these legendary figures who existed within the heart of arguably the most infamous and dark period in modern contemporary music history in which lives were tragically lost.


Chapter 1

JERRY HELLER:

So I said, “You got anything to play to me?” and he just looked at me and he said, “Yeah.” So right then and there, I knew that this was a no-bullshit, no-nonsense kind of guy willing to let the music do the talking, not telling what he’d done or who he has or how he was going to do it, you know. He just said, “Yeah.”

So we went inside and while we were in one room Ren was carving his initials into the guy; the owner of Macola’s desk. He just thought he would do that because he was bored. But Eazy played me “Boyz-N-The-Hood” and I think the fact that I was 44 or 45 at the time, and had grown up knowing who Gil Scott-Heron was and The Last Poets and The Rolling Stones and especially The Black Panthers, that I said to myself, “Wow!”

When someone can make me say wow, they’ve got something that’s worth getting into. It’s very hard to make me say wow! And the wow factor in music is an important factor and I think that anyone is successful is had to have said it. I’m sure that Irving (Azoff) said it when he heard The Eagles for the first time. I’m sure that Albert Grossman said it when he heard Janis Joplin and Bob Dylan for the first time. So I think it’s an important thing, the wow factor. And this made me say wow because it was a combination of Gil Scott-Heron, The Rolling Stones, The Last Poets and The Black Panthers and I said to myself, “This is the first time that the voice of our inner cities is really gonna be heard”.

Chapter 1

JERRY HELLER:

So I said, “You got anything to play to me?” and he just looked at me and he said, “Yeah.” So right then and there, I knew that this was a no-bullshit, no-nonsense kind of guy willing to let the music do the talking, not telling what he’d done or who he has or how he was going to do it, you know. He just said, “Yeah.”

So we went inside and while we were in one room Ren was carving his initials into the guy; the owner of Macola’s desk. He just thought he would do that because he was bored. But Eazy played me “Boyz-N-The-Hood” and I think the fact that I was 44 or 45 at the time, and had grown up knowing who Gil Scott-Heron was and The Last Poets and The Rolling Stones and especially The Black Panthers, that I said to myself, “Wow!”

When someone can make me say wow, they’ve got something that’s worth getting into. It’s very hard to make me say wow! And the wow factor in music is an important factor and I think that anyone is successful is had to have said it. I’m sure that Irving (Azoff) said it when he heard The Eagles for the first time. I’m sure that Albert Grossman said it when he heard Janis Joplin and Bob Dylan for the first time. So I think it’s an important thing, the wow factor. And this made me say wow because it was a combination of Gil Scott-Heron, The Rolling Stones, The Last Poets and The Black Panthers and I said to myself, “This is the first time that the voice of our inner cities is really gonna be heard”.

Chapter 4

YELLA:

It could be different things, or the most unique AIDS that ever happened because I knew somebody that used to live on my street a long time ago had AIDS. It took them nine months to a year to die. They were skinny, you know, just sick and this was – woo!

This is some very unique stuff. Like somebody put something in a vein or something. I really don’t – And an autopsy was never taken but you never know what can happen. If money is involved, anything can happen. Definitely anything can happen.

Every day above ground is a good day. People think, “Oh, I can’t pay my bills, I can’t pay this…” That is nothing. That is not that bad. Once you get under the ground, there’s no more of that, you know? You got to enjoy life while you can. I think Eazy’s death opened up the eyes — opened up the world’s eyes. Let ‘em know that AIDS, hey, that’s real stuff, you know.

Chapter 11

DR. DRE:

Now that Tupac is gone and Suge Knight is on lockdown, have you thought about working or approaching Death Row artists and restructuring and not acting as barbarians and doing this for the love of music only?

Why would I do that? No! I mean, as far as I’m concerned right now Death Row doesn’t even exist. I don’t do backflips. I’m looking for the future. My eyes are on tomorrow not yesterday, straight up.

I would love to work with Snoop. I would love to work with Kurupt. I would love to work with Rage. I would love to work with Nate Dogg. Those are the four artists that I really got love for from Death Row. Everybody else, I can’t do nothing for ya, man.

It’s gonna happen. Me and Snoop are gonna work together in the future. Those four artists I just named to you, we’ll be working together at some time in the future. When, I don’t know.

Chapter 16

DR. DRE:

Is revenge one of the states of mentality on this album?

I wouldn’t say it’s revenge. It’s basically like I said, it’s the shut the fuck up album. I had a couple of years where — Actually it was like this: I got married and my music softened up a little bit because I felt funny saying the lyrics that I was saying and being married and being a family man, but my wife actually was the motivation for me to get back to doing what I do, hardcore dirty Hip-Hop, straight up. I’m just happy doing that.

Did you make any sacrifices?

None at all. No sacrifices were made for this. The only thing I had to do, man, was go in there and do my thing and I had the support of a lot of good people.

Chapter 19

ICE CUBE:

What happened to the militant Ice Cube?

You lookin’ at him! You lookin’ at him. People always ask me why you don’t do records like you did earlier. People got to be receptive to the shit you sayin’. You can’t just do the record ‘cause you want to do it.

That’s what happened to Prince – just doing the records he want to do and not feeling the vibe of the people. You got to give them what they want when they want it.

You can’t just be no fuckin’ message man. There’s a lot of Emcees careers dead ‘cause they was trying to be too political, studious. Time wasn’t right. You got to hit the shit when the time is right.

Hopefully Terrorist Threats will send a wave through the consciousness of Hip-Hop and the time will be right for another one of them albums like back in the day. I got more shit. I was learning new shit back then, so whenever you want it, man. I’ll serve you with it.

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Chapter Overviews

A glance inside the book

Each chapter will unravel tall tales and give you new insight. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to learn what really happened.

Chapter I

Chapter I

Jerry Heller released his tell all Ruthless: A Memoir in August 2006. A first-hand account of his life as a “super-agent” responsible for booking colossal tours for the likes of Elton John, Pink Floyd, Marvin Gaye, The Guess Who, Journey and many others. Then as the force behind Eric “Eazy-E” Wright, Ruthless Records, N.W.A and the West Coast Gangster Rap revolution.

Chapter II

Chapter II

In the exclusive 1996 interview, Yella laid out what made N.W.A special, how he handled his business with Ruthless Records, and reaffirmed his contributions to the group.

Chapter IX

Chapter IX

There are three sides to every story. Your side. My side. And the truth. In 1996, long-time friends Ice Cube and Cypress Hill went to war for an entire year.

Chapter XVII

Chapter XVII

In 2001 Ice Cube was fourteen films into his celluloid career and on the verge of crossing over to mainstream acceptance with the upcoming release of the first film in the BarberShop series. In this exclusive interview from inside his trailer on the set of the final installment of the Friday series, Friday After Next, he reflected on his music career prior to the scheduled release of his Greatest Hits album on December 4, 2001.

Testimonials

the reviews are in!

Ben Westhoff, award-winning journalist and columnist for The Guardian, Author of Original Gangstas: The Untold Story of Dr. Dre, Eazy-E, Ice Cube, Tupac Shakur, and the Birth of West Coast Rap.

Ben Westhoff, award-winning journalist and columnist for The Guardian, Author of Original Gangstas: The Untold Story of Dr. Dre, Eazy-E, Ice Cube, Tupac Shakur, and the Birth of West Coast Rap.

For Decades Harris Rosen Has Been Asking Fearless Questions Of Hip-Hop's Biggest Names. N.W.A. - The Aftermath collects many of his best interviews, which challenge and draw out seminal figures like Dr. Dre, Ice Cube, and Jerry Heller. You won't find these interviews anywhere else. N.W.A. - The Aftermathis a must-read for fans of Ruthless, Death Row, and Aftermath.

Dr. Dre

This was a different one. I like that.

Dr. Dre
Jerry Heller

Jerry Heller

Harris Rosen is at the forefront of the current Hip-Hop Journalists, bright, articulate and totally fearless. My interview with Harris was stimulating and unique, and I now feel confidant that the basic honesty of the music and it's future as an Art Form will continue to be reported honestly and with integrity in his capable hands.

N.W.A: The Aftermath

Exclusive interviews with Dr. Dre, Ice Cube, Yella & Jerry Heller

Much of what you will read here has been sensationalized by others in a manner of journalistic psycho-speak. N.W.A: The Aftermath is as close to the truth as one can get. It delivers raw thoughts by real people and is manifested directly in the voice and words of the artists who made it happen.

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About the Author

who is Harris Rosen?

Father. Son. Brother.

Author career and biography

HARRIS ROSEN was born and resides in Toronto, Canada. For twenty years he self-published the national lifestyle magazine Peace! in Canada. He has interviewed hundreds of composers, artists, actors and athletes, including the Notorious B.I.G., Dr. Dre, Daft Punk, Eminem, Derek Jeter, Georges St. Pierre, Nirvana, Metallica, Chris Rock, Buju Banton, Beastie Boys, Kiss, Destiny's Child and Aaliyah to list a select few. He has traveled to six continents and was in the midst of a whirlwind of multiple musical cultural revolutions that occurred throughout the 90's and 2000's, while compiling a true and honest archive of audio, images and video.


Contact

Feel free to contact us with any questions in regards to N.W.A: The Aftermath or upcoming editions from the In Their Own Words: Behind the Music Tales of Truth, Fiction & Desire series.

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info@whoisharrisrosen.com

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