1992

Golden Age Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth Interview

1993

Rare Golden Age Intelligent Hoodlum Interview

1993

Golden Age In God We Trust Brand Nubian Interview

Book features

What you will learn from this book

The 80s produced and presented a parade of money earning Hip-Hop artists and groups that eclipsed even the highest of projected sales figures. What had once consisted of a savvy cadre of astute forward thinking independents spread to the corporate world of the major labels on the heels of the groundbreaking RUN-D.M.C. and Aerosmith single “Walk This Way”, and the Beastie Boys stream of singles leading up to “(You Gotta) Fight For Your Right (To Party)”.

Gone were the days that one could own or be in the know about almost every Hip-Hop crew. The Art Form was omnipresent as major labels began to snap up buzzing and bubbling independent labels, artists and groups with their ears to the streets. Diversity, quality, innovation and influence ruled the day. The Golden Age of Hip-Hop was in full effect and Eric B. became President for real.

During this period a movement of conscious afrocentric rappers captured the ears and eyes of a nation of millions picking up where groups like Public Enemy and filmmakers such as Spike Lee had left off.

Intelligent Hoodlum

How did Intelligent Hoodlum hook-up with the Juice Crew?

Tragedy Khadafi

The real story behind Tragedy Khadafi's crooked finger.

Tragedy Khadafi

The truth about his banned song, "Bullet".

Brand Nubian

Why they wrote "Punks Jump Up To Get Beat Down".

Brand Nubian

Who is the Devil?

Brand Nubian

The meaning of the song "Black Star Line".

Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth

What comes first? The lyrics or the beats?

Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth

What is their philosophy towards Rap?

Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth

Did the Biz Markie sampling case affect their production?

Exclusive audio clips

Real talk in their own words!

Tragedy Khadafi relays the street tale on why his finger is crooked. Lord Jamar speaks on separation and how Black people need to love themselves first. Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth speak on what sets them apart from other artists.

Preview the digital Amazon version here:

Excerpts from New York State of Mind 1.0

During this period a movement of conscious afrocentric rappers captured the ears and eyes of a nation of millions picking up where groups like Public Enemy and filmmakers such as Spike Lee had left off.


Tragedy Khadafi

Tragedy Khadafi:
When that shit ain’t work I got kind of discouraged. Then I just started fucking around on the street getting in trouble and shit. That’s when I got locked down. Then when I came home that’s when I got hooked up with Marley again. But it was fucked up be- cause I would still go in the studio but I’ll be getting in a lot of shit. I was on Volume 1, In Control Volume 1, Marley’s al- bum, and when that shit came out I was locked up.

Marley Marl featuring Percy Tragedy “Live Motivator”
https://youtu.be/iqcMBqHhh78

Me and my friends was joking about that yesterday, Lord, ‘cause me and Lord was locked up together, my man Lord, and he was like damn. We was joking about it yesterday. He was like “Damn! I remember when your shit dropped.” We was on Riker’s Island and I used to have my Walkman and listen to my own shit on the radio when I was in jail. I was like “Damn!” I wouldn’t want to listen to the whole thing. I’d just listen to a little bit and take it off, and I didn’t want to tell nobody ’cause I didn’t want motherfuckers to be like “Yo! What the fuck you doing here, you got a song out.” But then when I came home after that we hooked up, me and Marley hooked up again.

Ice:
So he stayed in contact with you?

Tragedy Khadafi:
Yeah, a little something. Well, I really had to stay in contact with him. He was real busy.

Tragedy Khadafi

Tragedy Khadafi:
When that shit ain’t work I got kind of discouraged. Then I just started fucking around on the street getting in trouble and shit. That’s when I got locked down. Then when I came home that’s when I got hooked up with Marley again. But it was fucked up be- cause I would still go in the studio but I’ll be getting in a lot of shit. I was on Volume 1, In Control Volume 1, Marley’s al- bum, and when that shit came out I was locked up.

Marley Marl featuring Percy Tragedy “Live Motivator”
https://youtu.be/iqcMBqHhh78

Me and my friends was joking about that yesterday, Lord, ‘cause me and Lord was locked up together, my man Lord, and he was like damn. We was joking about it yesterday. He was like “Damn! I remember when your shit dropped.” We was on Riker’s Island and I used to have my Walkman and listen to my own shit on the radio when I was in jail. I was like “Damn!” I wouldn’t want to listen to the whole thing. I’d just listen to a little bit and take it off, and I didn’t want to tell nobody ’cause I didn’t want motherfuckers to be like “Yo! What the fuck you doing here, you got a song out.” But then when I came home after that we hooked up, me and Marley hooked up again.

Ice:
So he stayed in contact with you?

Tragedy Khadafi:
Yeah, a little something. Well, I really had to stay in contact with him. He was real busy.

Brand Nubian

Dru Silver:
When I listen to your album it’s more like what kids nowadays want to listen to. When you listen to Puba’s its kind of sit down and relax music.

Lord Jamar:
That also goes to he’s older than us. He’s almost 30 years old. It’s like, we’re 24 years old. We’re coming from … We down with the old school now, we ain’t new to this, but at the same time we down with the new school, as far as we know what the people our age want to hear. He’s getting to a point in his life where he’s gonna make something to kick back and can’t do as much energy or whatever because you get older and just start to look at things different. We just … The way we came is we see the way things is go- ing on the street and all that and the sound that’s happening, and we just rolling where we feel is right. That’s about it.

Puba does not comment on it. He says something deep went down, and I heard something went down in San Francisco.

Lord Jamar:
Ain’t nothing that happened outside of New York. It’s nothing big. It ain’t nothing that really anybody needs to know about. It doesn’t really matter what went down. It’s just that it went down and this is the best for everybody. Really, exactly what happened, the world doesn’t need to know that. Everybody’s happy now. It’s not like someone had to suffer, like we broke up and now some- body’s poor and somebody’s on. We both straight, so let’s leave it at that.

Pete Rock & C.L. Smooth

J. Alexander Ferron:
The reason I got into Rap as a journalist was because I used to write raps but I could never say it, so it was frustrating.

C.L. Smooth:
But it offends a lot of people when you write their lyrics and I’m learning that more and more every time, but I felt that being that we’re a new group and being that we’re confident enough and we’ve proven that not only can the writing … It’s just not just one thing just not the writing. We could take our production and take somebody else’s writing and it’d still be us and we bring it to the next level. So it can be either or. It can be the writing, or we both just put in enough time and work to get a credible song people will listen to.

That’s what I get when listening to the album. You know what they’re taking about. You would rather not write a song about a topic that you don’t know about. You write about what you know about and you really be- lieve in it and that’s why it flows. That’s why it sounds good and makes sense.

C.L. Smooth:
Yeah. Well, you have to be comfortable. I’m comfortable to a certain point but it seems like when under pressure I’m a little bit more on point than I would be if I was just – if everything was just done for me. A lot of pressure has got me to this point. I mean, pressure is bad but it’s gotten me to the level where I want to be. It’s trained me and conditioned me.

New York State of Mind 1.0

Exclusive 1992 - 1993 interviews with Tragedy Khadafi, Brand Nubian, Pete Rock & C;> Smooth

New York State of Mind 1.0, the 7th book in the series, provides you with a true flavour of the personalities, in all their raw forms, who breathed life into the streets of the city, taking the music to new heights and in completely new directions.

iBooks FREE download!

iBooks FREE download!

$0.00

Kobo FREE download!

Kobo FREE download!

$0.00

About the Author

who is Harris Rosen?

Father. Son. Brother.

Author career and biography

HARRIS ROSEN grew up and resides in Toronto, Canada. For twenty years he self-published the national lifestyle magazine Peace! in Canada. He has interviewed hundreds of composers, artists, actors and athletes, including the Notorious B.I.G., Dr. Dre, Daft Punk, Eminem, Derek Jeter, Georges St. Pierre, Nirvana, Metallica, Chris Rock, Buju Banton, Beastie Boys, Kiss, Destiny's Child and Aaliyah to list a select few. He has traveled to six continents and was in the midst of a whirlwind of multiple musical cultural revolutions that occurred throughout the 90's and 2000's, while compiling a true and honest archive of audio, images and video.


Contact

Feel free to contact us with any questions in regards to New York State of Mind 1.0 or upcoming editions of the Behind the Music Tales series.

Contact information

QB-Spadina-Fort-York, Toronto, Canada
info@behindthemusictales.com

Send us a message