160+ link discography. The history of Da Mongoloids. The Real DJ Sneak. Original quotes by Kevin Saunderson, Arthur Baker, Byron Stingily, Moby, 808 State, Underworld, Giorgio Moroder, Stacey Pullen and Cajmere/Green Velvet.

Celestially photographed and unmasked in the age of Homework and Discovery

1997

HOMEWORK

2001

DISCOVERY

WHAT'S INSIDE?

The Real Daft Punk embodies the dynamic practices and principles that launched Daft Punk to superstardom presenting the essence and gift of Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo. A profound reflection of the tidal ebbs and flows of Dance Music intersected with divergent thinking. This book is honest behind the music tales of an exceptional brotherhood and the catalytic sea change fashioned by its comeuppance. Over two exclusive interviews with Daft Punk captured in the age of Homework and the gestation period leading up to and including the release of Discovery, The Real Daft Punk provides vital insight into how the duo achieved unparalleled success without compromising artistic integrity or musical vision

Homework

Exclusive interview

Discovery

Exclusive interview

Photos

80+ exclusive original photos

Pedro Winter

The man with the masterplan

Rico The Wizard

Who is this mystery man?

Da Mongoloids

Who are the members of this special collective?

DJ Sneak

An inside look at his first Birthday Beats featuring special guest Thomas Bangalter

House Music

How the battle between underground and overground was won

Collaborations

Different tempos and styles before Kanye West and The Weeknd

The French Touch

More than Disco loops

Groupies

The grass is always greener on the other side

The Sound

Destroying the old rules

Albums & Singles

Complete Discography

Solo

Complete Roulé & Crydamoure Discography

The Real Daft Punk is much more than the narrative of Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo exploding across international markets and opening up the Art Form to legions of new listeners. It is a story that, like its subjects, dismantles archaic unwritten rules of music industry conduct while providing the ideation necessary to lead a successful career as a confident creative with a rich legacy.

THE REAL DAFT PUNK

Book Trailer

The music in the trailer is not Daft Punk.

A look inside The Real Daft Punk

IN THEIR OWN WORDS

The Real Daft Punk answering the questions who is Daft Punk? What is their purpose? Where did their unique sound originate? When did they begin to devise different music? Why do they prefer to remain anonymous? And how do they create tracks?


The programmable Korg Ploysix analogue synthesiser capable of producing multiple tones at the same time coming in 1982, and the 61-key, six voice polyphonic Roland Juno-60 later the same year. Its hybrid digital and analogue electronic oscillator used in synthesisers, micro-controllers, and software-defined radios. The standardised protocol for electronic instruments and computers to connect and communicate, MIDI, Musical Instrument Digital Interface, in 1983.

“If it wasn’t for the technology, then nobody could be doing this style of music,” said Kevin Saunderson in our summer 1992 interview, to promote his upcoming Inner City album, Praise.

“I was one of the first people to be at the forefront of technology. The 808, the 909, the synthesisers. Even people like New Order, and Kraftwerk, and Depeche Mode, Pet Shop Boys. All those kinds of groups were dealing with electronic equipment as a different style. Our style was more for the dance audience and raw, and it was different because it was from Detroit and we had our vision. We brought it out. We made it known. But Techno was created by technology, because if you take it away what can you do really? You can’t do it, can you? You have to play live and acoustic and sound like everybody else.”

“Acclaimed second-generation Detroit Techno artist, Stacey Pullen, who learned the ropes from Derrick May, spoke on the impact of Kraftwerk on the sound of Detroit and its Black community, in a 1997 interview with documentarian Iara Lee for her feature-length Modulations: Cinema for the Ear.

“It was party music. It was real funky electronic party music, and the people in Detroit wanted that,” said Pullen.

“It was Electrifying Mojo; he played an important part in training the ear of the people of Detroit to listen to different things. They had fifteen-minute mixes of Devo, fifteen-minute mixes of Kraftwerk, and banging it into your head for seven days in a row. So we had no choice but to like it. The record companies now, if they were smart enough, they could do the same thing with this music that we’re doing. It’s always a pop phenomenon, pop culture that people – You – They want to hear it only because of the record companies just giving it to them like that. It’s all about having the balls to push it to people to let them know that this is the new and exciting thing that’s happening. This is the future, this is creativity, this is art, this music, at the end of the day.”

The programmable Korg Ploysix analogue synthesiser capable of producing multiple tones at the same time coming in 1982, and the 61-key, six voice polyphonic Roland Juno-60 later the same year. Its hybrid digital and analogue electronic oscillator used in synthesisers, micro-controllers, and software-defined radios. The standardised protocol for electronic instruments and computers to connect and communicate, MIDI, Musical Instrument Digital Interface, in 1983.

“If it wasn’t for the technology, then nobody could be doing this style of music,” said Kevin Saunderson in our summer 1992 interview, to promote his upcoming Inner City album, Praise.

“I was one of the first people to be at the forefront of technology. The 808, the 909, the synthesisers. Even people like New Order, and Kraftwerk, and Depeche Mode, Pet Shop Boys. All those kinds of groups were dealing with electronic equipment as a different style. Our style was more for the dance audience and raw, and it was different because it was from Detroit and we had our vision. We brought it out. We made it known. But Techno was created by technology, because if you take it away what can you do really? You can’t do it, can you? You have to play live and acoustic and sound like everybody else.”

“Acclaimed second-generation Detroit Techno artist, Stacey Pullen, who learned the ropes from Derrick May, spoke on the impact of Kraftwerk on the sound of Detroit and its Black community, in a 1997 interview with documentarian Iara Lee for her feature-length Modulations: Cinema for the Ear.

“It was party music. It was real funky electronic party music, and the people in Detroit wanted that,” said Pullen.

“It was Electrifying Mojo; he played an important part in training the ear of the people of Detroit to listen to different things. They had fifteen-minute mixes of Devo, fifteen-minute mixes of Kraftwerk, and banging it into your head for seven days in a row. So we had no choice but to like it. The record companies now, if they were smart enough, they could do the same thing with this music that we’re doing. It’s always a pop phenomenon, pop culture that people – You – They want to hear it only because of the record companies just giving it to them like that. It’s all about having the balls to push it to people to let them know that this is the new and exciting thing that’s happening. This is the future, this is creativity, this is art, this music, at the end of the day.”

The essence of Bangalter’s words helps to uncover variables of the equation that compels the duo to maintain anonymity. The yin and yang of Virgin Records running collateral campaigns, and the pair refusing to play a part in the filthy lucre often associated with success.
Here you are an international priority for Virgin Records, but you want to retain your anonymity.

“Yeah!” agreed Bangalter. “This is it, but what I say is maybe it’s inevitable to become more or less the thing, to become more or less very famous and the star thing, but maybe the logo is more the star. I’m saying, where you see the logo everywhere. In New York, there are lots of posters, and here there’s lots of stickers, posters, and stuff, so it’s becoming more or less very, very big. But at least as part of the promotional thing, it’s not our face. We don’t want us to be the star. If it is the music gets more and more popular and if people love it, then eventually, Daft Punk, in itself, will be maybe a star thing, and then, maybe. But not doing the dumb thing and as an ego thing, and we can make things, push the music forward. This is not at all something that we want to take personally.”

Thomas Bangalter marked his return to Toronto to participate in the Boomer Brothers Presents DJ Sneak’s Birthday Beats at Industry Nightclub on November 5, 1998. The bill was Kaizer Soze aka DJ Juan, who is Sneak’s brother, King Britt, Junior Sanchez, Thomas Bangalter & DJ Sneak on four decks, and Chicago House legend Derrick Carter closed the night.
The party was discreetly promoted to those in the know and attended by 850. (Multiple sites offer a recording of the evening listing the event as the 1997 Industry DJ set of Daft Punk.)

The next day, Thomas Bangalter flew to Jamaica with Toronto residents Rory Levy (Boomer Brothers), Matt C (Industry), and Gavin Gerbz, and spent four nights on the seven-mile beach of Negril.

GAVIN GERBZ:

We wanted to do something special for Sneak’s birthday. I called Pedro to see if Thomas would be interested in coming over to surprise him. The event was on a Thursday night and had the energy of a Saturday night rager. It was the perfect getaway for Thomas as people were straight up bootlegging “Music Sounds Better With You” all over the world, due to its massive success. Unfortunately, other “friends” in the game were letting him down as well. We decided on a spontaneous four day trip to Jamaica after the surprise birthday party at Industry. Thomas needed to get away from Europe, and we bonded during that Toronto/Jamaica trip. Fast forward to 2007, and Rory Levy extended an invitation to manage and sell merchandise on the Alive 2007 tour. He was the only non-Parisian in the crew.

Thomas Bangalter and DJ Sneak four-turntable set
https://www.mixesdb.com/w/1998_-_DJ_Sneak_@_The_Industry,_Toronto

In sync with the musical evolution and revolution of Daft Punk, Hip-Hop and R&B producers began to integrate the pulse of House and Techno tempting a full diverse demographic with dancefloor appeal reaching new commercial heights. Mannie Fresh was connecting the southern Gangsta Rap of Cash Money Records New Orleans call and response Bounce to Miami Bass utilising samples and 808 loops. Timbaland, Swizz Beatz, and The Neptunes building number one hits on synth riffs and keyboards.

Indeed, Daft Punk lay years ahead of the curve. The electro-funk and soul of Discovery an aural roadmap to the sounds of today, living to inspire purveyors of post-Disco French House and auto-tune architects. An omen of future studio sessions and collaborations with Kanye West, Pharrell Williams, Nile Rodgers, and The Weeknd. The duo spoke on the influence of Hip-Hop producers and possible collaboration.

“Maybe you got more House producers that are digging Hip-Hop and do some downtempo tracks than you have Hip-Hop producers that make House beats,” said Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo. “But, at this moment it’s very exciting. OutKast, Neptunes, and Rockwilder especially, who has the electronic sound. In House music, people tend to try different things, but we’re still not making music together. So, the next step is for us to make music with them, or for them to make music for us. Not us, but just House producers. Maybe it already exists, just not on a larger scale.”

Fast forward to 2007. Kanye West inserted a vocoder sample of “Harder, Faster, Better, Faster” on “Stronger.” West and his team allegedly mixing it over seventy-five times, working with eight audio engineers, and eleven mix engineers. Finally retaining Timbaland to revitalise its drum programming before approving it for his Graduation album. West unhappy to the bitter end claiming it failed to live up to the Daft Punk original.

“Stronger” hit number one on the charts in Canada, New Zealand, Turkey, UK, and the U.S., selling over seven million copies in the U.S., and winning the Grammy Award for Best Rap Solo Performance at the 50th Annual Grammy Awards. The song inspiring Hip-Hop producers to blend House and Electro in their music, and playing a part in the resurgence of the Art Forms and Daft Punk’s rise in mainstream culture.

The relationship between Hip-Hop and R&B coming full circle with Daft Punk co-producing four songs – “I Am God,”
“Send It Up,” “On Sight,” “Black Skinhead” – on West’s critically acclaimed 2013 album, Yeezus. Bangalter and de Homem-Christo going on to co-produce and feature on two singles – “Starboy,” and “I Feel It Coming” – off The Weeknd’s Starboy album generating over one billion streams in 2017.

The unyielding desire of Daft Punk to innovate while refusing to be tied to any direct or indirect movement attempting to penetrate its music and image, whatsoever. Illustrated within the heart of all output, from songs and remixes to graphics and videos, soundtracks and films. Bangalter and de Homem-Christo the break the rules guys when it came to codified standards of engagement.

This is the question of Daft Punk and Discovery. The exceptional line thoroughbred creatives straddle yet fear to cross. Breed success, take the money and run. Risk being branded a sellout and end up locked out of the core structure you helped build. Though, in the case of Daft Punk, it can hardly be termed a dilemma when the combatants refuse to care about the outcome. The danger and perception more significant than the reality.

You have two kinds of people that are into House music. You have people that are into changing things globally, so it can be to make this music widely accepted. Then you have other people that want to keep it underground and confidential because if it’s confidential people feel more like they’re part of a secret society. Either you’re organising the revolution, then once the revolution is global, you’re selling out. By selling out you’re doing it not for the principal, you’re doing it to make money. The other is if you want to be part of a secret society, then you’re very angry at people. For us, we want music to be shared. Maybe some people want to keep the music for five friends and knowing the new hot stuff. We think differently. Something really good for everybody, to show it to more people because it’s a good feeling. It’s music, and it’s supposed to be bringing people together.

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