100000000

Lil Wayne records sold

300000000

Estimated value of Cash Money Records

150000000

Estimated Cash Money Records albums sold

180000000

Estimated net worth of Birdman

Book Features

Magnolia Home of tha Soldiers, the 9th book in the series, is a look at how Cash Money Records produced some of the iconic stars of the last two decades, and continues to cash in on the day.

Turk

I'm An Untamed Guerilla

B.G.

Shit I Kick Be Real

Juvenile

I Don't Get Caught In The Mist

Lil Wayne

I'm Gonna Live and Die In This Here

Mannie Fresh

This Year I Got A Space Shuttle Parked Out Around The Corner

Birdman

I Look At It We Got To Hustlin'

Godfather Slim

I Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Else Guide Our Destiny

Raw and real Slim, Turk, Mannie Fresh, B.G., and Juvenile revelations.

Book Trailer

Image and audio excerpts of Magnolia: Home of tha Soldiers

Preview the digital Amazon version here:

Samples

Excerpts of Magnolia: Home of tha Soldiers

Get raw and real Lil Wayne, B.G., Juvenile, and Turk revelations of
their teen years. Learn how Mannie Fresh created all Cash Money Records music. Unmask the mystery of CEO “Slim” and discover the keys to success in an ultra rare enlightening interview.


Chapter 2

Did you grow up in this area of the Magnolia?

Turk:
I’m in Kenner right now. I grew up around Robinson Street in front of the school in the Magnolia Project.

What did you do coming up?

Turk:
What an average Black man do; hustle. You got to put food on the table.Get it how they live.

How important is hustlin’ to the whole Project?

Turk:
My momma at the time she was strugglin’. My daddy, he was an old wino. He ain’t do nothing for me, and I didn’t want to see us … We had two … There was three of us, it was hard for my mom, and by me being the oldest I felt like I had to what I had to do, so I started hustlin’.

Is that how you ran into everyone else in the crew?

Turk:
No. One day they came around here at a DJ. Call it a DJ, everybody get together. Niggas would be playing outside and they popped up, and Magnolia Shorty, a female artist they had a year, two years ago, she introduced me to ‘em and I went up to ‘em, they gave me a card. I kept calling them, bothering them, told me to come to the studio. I got on one of Juvenile’s albums he was doing his album. I got on about three songs and the rest history, the new Cash Money.

Magnolia Shorty – Monkey On Tha Dick
https://youtu.be/YR7VbTbeIzI

Chapter 2

Did you grow up in this area of the Magnolia?

Turk:
I’m in Kenner right now. I grew up around Robinson Street in front of the school in the Magnolia Project.

What did you do coming up?

Turk:
What an average Black man do; hustle. You got to put food on the table.Get it how they live.

How important is hustlin’ to the whole Project?

Turk:
My momma at the time she was strugglin’. My daddy, he was an old wino. He ain’t do nothing for me, and I didn’t want to see us … We had two … There was three of us, it was hard for my mom, and by me being the oldest I felt like I had to what I had to do, so I started hustlin’.

Is that how you ran into everyone else in the crew?

Turk:
No. One day they came around here at a DJ. Call it a DJ, everybody get together. Niggas would be playing outside and they popped up, and Magnolia Shorty, a female artist they had a year, two years ago, she introduced me to ‘em and I went up to ‘em, they gave me a card. I kept calling them, bothering them, told me to come to the studio. I got on one of Juvenile’s albums he was doing his album. I got on about three songs and the rest history, the new Cash Money.

Magnolia Shorty – Monkey On Tha Dick
https://youtu.be/YR7VbTbeIzI

Chapter 3

What’s life like as B.G.?

B.G.:
It’s all good. I ain’t really want for nothing. I ain’t hurtin’. I got money, I got hoes, my family’s straight, travelin’, ya dig. Platinum albums, see what I’m sayin’? It’s just all good.

How do you keep your mind on the music when all that shit is going around you?

B.G.:
That’s my life. That’s all I know. That’s all I got. I dropped out of school in tenth grade, so I can’t get no job. They don’t hire you without no High School diploma, but I’m in the process of getting my G.E.D. now. Rap, that’s all I got, that’s my life. I write everyday. I stay ’cause I know what’s gonna give me pay, and Rap is gonna take me to the bank.

Why are your lyrics so deep? What’s going on in your mind?

B.G.:
I’ve been through it all. I’ve been through it all a juvenile to go through. From hustlin’, to jackin’, stealing cars, jail, whatever. I’m in the ghetto. I’m in the streets day for day. Even though I got money that still don’t change me. I see what’s going on around me, so I give niggas what they can feel, and all hoods the same. All ghettos the same all across the world. That’s why niggas respect my mind and know it ain’t no fantasize. Shit I kick be real.

Chapter 4

How ill does it get in the Magnolia?

Juvenile:
It ain’t the Projects, it’s the people in it. It can be a motherfucker off the outside come in here and commit a murder. Murder is murder no matter where it happen at. This Project is cause for crime because it’s so many poor people. People broke, man. Motherfuckers struggling. If you gave everybody in this Project a million dollars a piece I don’t think you would have crime back here. It’s a money thing and everybody trying to get it. If you have at least $20 000 and the next man don’t have it, and you out there with it and maybe he feel
like he can take it to do what he got to do, he gonna do what he got to do, so that’s life.

No matter how hard you work for your money there’s ten guy working harder to take if from you.

Juvenile:
Yeah, but that was as far as the money is concerned. It ain’t so much of the money. Motherfuckers just want to be seen. Motherfuckers want to be in that spotlight, even if it means being in the spotlight for a minute. They’ll put they life on the line to be in the spotlight, and I’ve been through it. I feel they pain. Motherfuckers struggling.

What have you seen growing up here?

Juvenile:
Shit, I seen everything. That type of shit I’d rather not even talk about what I’ve seen. I would be a Rat if I sit here and tell you what I seen. I’ve seen a lot. I’ve done did things and all that, but that ain’t nothin’ to be saying in an interview.

Who came first, you or No Limit?

Juvenile:
I don’t want to discuss that. Go to the next question.

Chapter 5

What is the game?

Lil Wayne:
Run or get ran over.

What happens if someone crosses Lil Wayne?

Lil Wayne:
They get crossed out, and that’s if they cross me they better cross me out. If you gonna get in my way, push me down to make me fall to where I never get up ‘cause if I get back up I’m a move you. Like I say, I was taught never give up and anything in your way move it.

How do you stay ahead of everyone else? There’s a lot of people who think like that but your actions and reactions put you over.

Lil Wayne:
Live by it and die by it. Live by what I was told. A lot of people think like that. A lot of people don’t mean that. I mean that, feel me.

Has it ever come to that?

Lil Wayne:
Many a time.

Chapter 6

Do you get any free time?

Mannie Fresh:
Nah, not really, not really. I’m in the studio late tonight. I don’t really … I ain’t happy unless I’m in the studio anyway, so it don’t really matter.

What kind of stuff are you coming up with lately?

Mannie Fresh:
Lately, I’ve been doing some 80s type stuff like I’m on some … Plus I’m on some old Disco type stuff, ya feel me? I’ve been doing Disco shit plus that 80s type sound shit just to kind of get away from what everybody is doing but I’m still incorporating it my way. I listen to a lot of songs and do it my way.

What is the Mannie Fresh way?
Mannie Fresh:
You know, that Bounce feel to it, that dance feel to it, that energy. The shit that just gets you up and make you bob your head. I try to produce tracks from a DJ perspective like the type of music that will get the crowd crunk, that will get it up and running.

What about “Fuck The World” on the ‘Lil Wayne album? It’s kind of a slow jam in a way and not Bounce.

Mannie Fresh:
That was his thing. That song was more-so made out of him than me, and I just met him like 90-percent of the way in doing the song. It was something that he wanted to get across, so it wasn’t nothing that I really could do my way. And it’s some real shit that he’s spittin’, so I felt like I owed him out of respect to do it that way.

Lil Wayne – “Fuck The World”
https://youtu.be/1qlKkIw_meY

Chapter 7

How much control do you have over the artists?

Baby:
100% is mandatory. I don’t look at it control, that’s a business term. I look at it we got to hustlin’, we hustlin’. Control ain’t the word. You don’t control no man. We have Chiefs and Indians out here.

How do you and your brother divide up the duties of running the business?

Baby:
It’s an easy divide ‘cause it’s two of us. I don’t find this shit really being hard. The only hard thing was for me fucking with this movie ‘cause it was a challenge to me. I was doing movies, doing concerts and recording and that shit, that was kind of like a challenge for me.

You’re an artist as well with Big Tymers.

Baby:
Yeah.

What’s that all about?

Baby:
Game spittin’ without a doubt.

BUY NOW!

Chapter Overviews

An inside look at Magnolia: Home of tha Soldiers

Magnolia Home of tha Soldiers is a very real account of being a young
Black man hustling to put food on the table while fighting for his place in the music scene. It gets the answers you want, from a group of young artists who have had to fight and struggle every day to get what they wanted and to be where they are.

Chapter 1

Chapter 1

Cash Money Records was in full bloom in the summer of 1999. From the fall of 1998, through the summer of 1999 the label had sold millions of albums. Juvenile’s 400 Degreez led the charge on the strength of monster singles “Ha” and “Back That Azz Up”; B.G. dominated the spring with certified classic “Bling Bling”; and Hot Boys heated up the summer with “I Need A Hot Girl”. Back to back to back to back hits, that placed them on the tip of everyone’s tongue.

Chapter 3

Chapter 3

B.G. was born Christopher Dorsey, September 3, 1980. B.G. was the original Hot Boy signed to Cash Money Records. His father died when he was young. Cash Money Records owners are Ronald and Bryan Williams stepped in as “big brothers” and played a major role in his life helping his mother to raise him. Dubbed Lil Doogie, He was paired up with Lil Wayne, then known as Baby D, and together the duo recorded their first album True Story for Cash Money Records as the BG‘z.

Chapter 5

Chapter 5

Lil Wayne was born Dwayne Michael Carter, Jr., September 27, 1982. Lil’ Wayne entered the Rap game at the age of 9 and signed with Cash Money Records at 10. An only child living in the Projects, life moved at a rapid pace as his responsibilities increased. Though he excelled in school and became an Honours student, to care for his mother his after-school program placement was hustlin’ on the block. He recorded his first Cash Money Records album, True Story, at the age of 12, when he went by Lil Doogie, in a group called the BG’z with B.G. In an unfortunate accident, he shot himself in the chest with his mother’s 9 mm at the age of 12, and shortly thereafter took an extended leave of absence from the music business. He marked his return to Cash Money Records at the age of 14 and then dropped out of school in 1996 to pursue a music career full-time.

Chapter 8

Chapter 8

“Godfather Slim” was born Ronald Williams, May 23, 1967. Ronald “Godfather Slim” Williams is the CO-founder of Cash Money Records. He and his brother, Bryan “Birdman” Williams, came up with the Housing Projects of New Orleans hustling before starting the label in 1991 and built its foundation one seed at a time. Not much is known about Ronald "Godfather Slim" Williams. He likes to stay behind the scenes and let his brother, Bryan "Birdman” Williams, bask in the limelight. The number of published interviews with him can be recorded on one hand.

Magnolia: Home of tha Soldiers

Exclusive interviews with the Hot Boys & Cash Money Millionaires

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About the Author

Who is Harris Rosen?

Father. Son. Brother.

Author career and biography

HARRIS ROSEN grew up and resides in Toronto, Canada. For twenty years he self-published the national lifestyle magazine Peace! in Canada. He has interviewed hundreds of composers, artists, actors and athletes, including the Notorious B.I.G., Dr. Dre, Daft Punk, Eminem, Derek Jeter, Georges St. Pierre, Nirvana, Metallica, Chris Rock, Buju Banton, Beastie Boys, Kiss, Destiny's Child and Aaliyah to list a select few. He has traveled to six continents and was in the midst of a whirlwind of multiple musical cultural revolutions that occurred throughout the 90's and 2000's, while compiling a true and honest archive of audio, images and video.


Contact

Feel free to contact us with any questions in regards to Magnolia: Home of tha Soldiers or upcoming editions from the Behind the Music Tales series.

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info@behindthemusictales.com

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